Call of Duty

Programmer Shows Consoles Aren't Safe from Warzone Cheaters

One programmer showcased just how easy it is to create a hack or cheat software for Call of Duty: Warzone.
One programmer showcased just how easy it is to create a hack or cheat software for Call of Duty: Warzone. / Activision

One programmer showcased just how easy it is to create a hack or cheat software for Call of Duty: Warzone.

It looks like Warzone players will have another threat to contend with, in the near future. Thanks to YouTube content creator Sjas0a32, illicit software for the game is quick, easy, and takes no time at all—which is extremely poor news for console players who thought themselves safe from the game's "infested" reputation. In a now unlisted video, Sjas0a32 displayed how in just five hours they were able to train an AI to tag and display the location of other players.

"I trained this AI with 1800 Pictures of Ingame footage," they wrote in the video description, "I don't know much about AIs, so clearly more talented people will develop console cheats that are almost impossible to detect."

Essentially, they stated they were a novice at this corner of programming, but if they could accomplish a working software with ease then certainly an experienced cheater could replicate—or, god forbid, improve it—on a larger scale.

In a companion tweet, they explained how they were easily able to get their cheat to perform on console, but reaffirmed that they "wont make a cheat / share the source code." They also tagged the Anti-Cheat Police Department (@AntiCheatPD), a voluntary force dedicated to hack/cheat protection and "detect and disrupt cheating organisations."

"OpenCV is not the end of fps gaming it's been around for a while and it will be detectable for consoles, it's just the fact that it exists is concerning for tournament plays that don't look into it," they wrote.

The force continued to explain that, ultimately, Microsoft and Sony "have full control over what input is allowed to the controller." Unfortunately, that will likely be a next-next-generation invention, they wrote in a short thread, but there are still plenty of ways to stop the behavior. Instead, they urged players to focus more on "internal and external memory cheats" that exist for a larger number of titles beyond the FPS genre.

There's no telling just how far the hackers will evolve. It seems that players will just have to cross their fingers and hope Activision and Raven Software can develop an effective anti-cheat before such softwares develop beyond control.