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Rockstar Games Has Removed the Confederate Flag From GTA Trilogy

Rockstar Games has removed the Confederate Flag from its GTA Trilogy remaster according to the latest trailer.
Rockstar Games has removed the Confederate Flag from its GTA Trilogy remaster according to the latest trailer. / Rockstar Games

Rockstar Games has removed the Confederate Flag from its GTA Trilogy remaster according to the latest trailer.

The change was originally spotted by Kotaku on Monday, Oct. 25. About 30 seconds into the video, players are reunited with Phil Cassidy, an arms dealer who appears within the set of games to help outfit the player. In the previous rendition, Cassidy's shirt is black and clearly depicts the Confederate flag on it bordered in gold. That doesn't appear to be the case anymore.

Rockstar Games has Removed the Confederate Flag from GTA Trilogy

Cassidy's shirt now has a white skull in the center of its golden border on a black background. The flag is entirely missing. This isn't his primary outfit, however. As he is a recurring character in GTA III, Vice City, Liberty City Stories, and Vice City Stories, he has multiple wardrobes. The flag shirt only appears in Vice City.

Rockstar isn't the only company to take a stand against the flag in the past decade. Apple has removed all games that feature the symbol and Twitch has banned any appearance of it on its platform. Now, if only Rockstar could put an end to players roleplaying as members of the Ku Klux Klan in Red Dead Online. It appears the player base will have to put its faith in the community's racism bounty hunters for now.

To many, the Confederate flag is a symbol of the racist history of the southern states. Also known colloquially as the "traitor flag" and "loser flag," its most popular appearance is actually a rejected pattern that was eventually incorporated into the second and third iterations of the official design.

Nevertheless, it has been flown on its own as the 1860's insurrection's "battle flag" and has since become synonymous with it due to the ideals it stood for—namely, one put forward in Alexander H. Stephens' speech to The Savannah Theatre in 1861.