Call of Duty

Warzone Anti-Cheat Banhammer Crushes 30,000 Accounts

The latest round of bans went into effect on Tuesday, March 16, removing yet another 30,000 accounts—bringing the total close to 60,000 within the las
The latest round of bans went into effect on Tuesday, March 16, removing yet another 30,000 accounts—bringing the total close to 60,000 within the las / Activision

The latest round of bans went into effect on Tuesday, March 16, removing yet another 30,000 accounts—bringing the total close to 60,000 within the last 30 days.

Cheating has been a prolific issue in Warzone since the game's release. It was so prevalent that some hack companies had websites advertising their services—which became the subject of a lawsuit by Activision in August 2020. Unfortunately, that only managed to cut one head off the hydra of unfair gameplay.

Since then, the company has attempted to be more transparent about its anti-cheat measures, publishing messages to players about exactly that upon loading into the game. The recently added Wisconsin-based developer, Raven Software, has committed fully to this—posting constant updates to its verified Twitter page.

Warzone Anti-Cheat Banhammer Crushes 30,000 Accounts

Nearly 100,000 accounts have been banned so far in 2021 with three unique ban waves and, we're sure, other accounts scattered along the way. Unfortunately, its effect hasn't been apparent within the community.

Part of this comes from just how easy it is to cheat in Warzone. With most of the player base on PC, all it takes is a single download to acquire whatever advantage one could want. Banning individual accounts doesn't do much to stop the process, either, as cheaters can simply make an alternate account using a different e-mail address.

Warzone isn't alone in this, either. Any game lacking significantly powerful anti-cheat software can fall prey to hackers. The best way to defeat them is to detect illicit software on start-up or permanently blacklist a player's unique address—two traits that can be faked with enough programming experience.

Hopefully, Activision and Raven can build something to keep the majority of cheaters out. Until then, however, the battle continues.