Call of Duty

Warzone Developers Privatize All Player Accounts

Developers at Activision and Raven Software randomly privatized all player accounts in the game. | Photo by Activision, Raven Software.
Developers at Activision and Raven Software randomly privatized all player accounts in the game. | Photo by Activision, Raven Software.

As part of a surprise move, Activision has privatized all player accounts for those playing Warzone, which indirectly stopped data-viewing applications for players to check on their performance during or after the game.

Typically, players are free to use skill-based matchmaking services (SBMM), similar to a service like Blitz for Valorant, in order to view statistics about the people players are with. The information could be as revealing or as basic as possible, but most players use various services in order to just check other player's kill-to-death ratio, as well as their own.

Though it may seem like a small step, players are starting to feel the repercussions of the move. Those who wanted to play in Z League tournaments have now been canceled as organizers are unable to verify and analyze player statistics to see if the player participating is playing legitimately or otherwise.

Popular SBMM site, WZ Stats, released a statement via Twitter on Friday which explained that the company found out that player accounts were somehow switched from public to private.

"It seems like all public accounts are now private. We don't know whether that's intentional," as tweeted by the company.

SBMM sites like WZ Stats among others are able to access the data that players have through Call of Duty's application programming interface, better known as API. In-game performance will be shown and compare a player's skills to that of professional-level players or to indirectly help players understand what they could have done to be better in the game. However, players using the SBMM service need to authorize their accounts with the site in order for the service to actually access their profile data.

At of the time of writing this story, there have been no statements from either Activision nor Raven Software that explain why the sudden switch of profile privacy.